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A Legal Hail Mary

Posted by George Butterfield on March 5, 2015 in Uncategorized

In one of football’s last-gasp comeback plays, the “Hail Mary” pass, the losing team’s quarterback rolls back and launches the football as far as possible hoping one of his receivers can—as in the answer to a prayer—haul in the toss and win the game.

In Oklahoma last December, a high school district attempted the legal equivalent of a Hail Mary, seeking a court order to replay a portion or all of a high school playoff game. The court, however, deferred instead to the state high school athletic association, which ruled the game complete and upheld the high school team’s loss.

Read the rest of the article here.

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Carrying a Gun on Campus

Posted by George Butterfield on February 28, 2015 in Uncategorized

Several states already allow students to carry guns on college campuses and several more are considering it. What do you think?

Read an article on the subject here.

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Supreme Court Justice Cites Dr. Seuss

Posted by George Butterfield on February 26, 2015 in Uncategorized

The case, Yates v. United States, was published February 25th. The citation occurred in the dissent which was written by Justice Kagan. You can read the case here.

The specific citation is to Dr. Seuss, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish (1960).

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A Case Study in Controlled Implosions

Posted by George Butterfield on February 25, 2015 in Uncategorized

When the government has a dog of a case, someone has to draw the short straw and argue it. In Henderson v. United States, Assistant to the Solicitor General Ann O’Connell drew that straw. It seems clear that the Court will side with petitioner Tony Henderson – a felon seeking the right to sell or otherwise dispose of firearms that he owns but can no longer legally possess. In offering concession after concession and various fallback options, the government offered a case study in controlled implosions.

Read the rest of the article here.

Whoof, whoof.

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Texas v. United States

Posted by George Butterfield on February 24, 2015 in Uncategorized

Texas v. United States is the recent case where an injunction was granted against President Obama’s immigration directives. It is an interesting case that illustrates how three different types of primary authority (cases, statutes, and regulations) are referred to and become an integral part of the opinion.

A free copy of the opinion can be downloaded here.

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Punxsutawney Phil: Fugitive From Justice

Posted by George Butterfield on February 12, 2015 in Uncategorized

An arrest warrant has been issued for Punxsutawney Phil. Be on the lookout.

“The suspect is furry. Only a couple of feet long. Two big teeth. And, it would seem, he has it in for the people of the American Northeast.  He’s Punxsutawney Phil, and he’s a wanted groundhog, according to police in Merrimack, New Hampshire.”

Read the rest here.

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When a Monkey Takes a Selfie

Posted by George Butterfield on August 11, 2014 in Uncategorized

When a monkey takes a selfie on your camera, who owns the copyright? This is being discussed here.

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Bar Exam Snafu

Posted by George Butterfield on July 31, 2014 in Uncategorized

New law graduates in many states experienced a technology snafu at the worst  possible time Tuesday night: as they were attempting to upload bar examinations  just before deadlines in their states. Many reported spending hours trying and  failing to upload their answers.

Read the full article here.

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Movies and Court Martials

Posted by George Butterfield on July 21, 2014 in Uncategorized

The Law Librarians of Congress blog has a nice article on movies that cover famous court martials. You can check out the article here. One of the movies discussed is Breaker Mourant which can be checked out of the library.

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SAGE Publications Busts “Peer Review and Citation Ring”

Posted by George Butterfield on July 10, 2014 in Uncategorized

This one deserves a “wow.”

SAGE Publishers is retracting 60 articles from the Journal of Vibration and Control after an investigation revealed a “peer review and citation ring” involving a professor in Taiwan.

Read the full article here.

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