Prudent Charity: Spring 2018 PPE Reading Group

This spring Creighton University students will take on the topic of prudent charity. The concept of prudence has long been associated with the ideas that were formally realized in the discipline of economics. Charity, an equally expansive concept, comes from the word caritas or what unites us to God. These ideas don’t necessarily contradict, but in practice, they tend to highlight different areas of intellectual interest. To create this conversation IEI has asked Dr. Christina McRorie to help plan and administer a conversation among the students that will ultimately end the weekend of April 20th – 22nd in St. Louis with a symposium hosted by St. Louis University and Lindenwood University.

Click “continue reading” for the list of readings.

Continue reading Prudent Charity: Spring 2018 PPE Reading Group

Kenefick Lecture: The Invisible Hand – Its Purpose and Ours

The following was written by Katheryn Furlong and Carly Rademacher

Dr. Martha Campbell, Emeritus Professor of Economics at the State University of New York Potsdam, visited campus on November 1st to speak with students and faculty about Adam Smith’s notion of the Invisible Hand. She came as a part of the “Reconceiving Social Theory: Toward a More Integral Humanism.” lecture series. The series is sponsored by the Kenefick Humanities Chair, and seeks to respond to Pope Francis’s call in his encyclical Laudato Si’: “We urgently need a humanism capable of bringing together the different fields of knowledge, including economics, in the service of a more integral and integrating vision.”
Continue reading Kenefick Lecture: The Invisible Hand – Its Purpose and Ours

PPE Reading Group – October 3rd, 2017

The PPE group engages in weekly conversations with diverse points of view in an effort to deepen our understanding of the intersection between politics, philosophy, and economics

This week in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics reading group, we read and discussed An Essay on Fiscal Federalism by W.E Oates. The article examined the ways in which a restructuring of our federal and state relationships could improve government performance. We also read and discussed The Dilemma of Fiscal Federalism: Grants and Fiscal Performance Around the World by Jonathan Rodden, which addressed the positives and negatives of fiscal equalization. On the discussion board, the conversation center around two main topics: The relationship between federalism and civil rights and the dilemma of fiscal equalization and exit.

Click “continue reading” for a selection of our conversation.
Continue reading PPE Reading Group – October 3rd, 2017

Streetcars: Mobility or Amenity?

The following was written by the Urban Policy Research Group.

Mass Transit moves people, reduces congestion, and helps a city grow. It can come in the form of buses, subways, or streetcars. Understanding how public transportation is central to an urban development plan is the first step towards understanding the dynamics of urban living.

Continue reading Streetcars: Mobility or Amenity?

PPE Reading Group – September 26th, 2017

The PPE group engages in weekly conversations with diverse points of view in an effort to deepen our understanding of the intersection between politics, philosophy, and economics

This week in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics reading group, we read and discussed Polycentricity, Self-Governance, and the Art & Science of Association by Peter Boettke, Jayme Lemke, and Liya Palagashvili. The article discussed the similarities and differences in the art and science of association between Elinor and Vincent Ostrom and the Austrian school of Economics. We also read and discussed Charles Tiebout’s seminal 1956 essay, A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures. On the discussion board, the conversation center around two main topics: Exit, voice, and loyalty applied to controversy surrounding the NFL and the interplay between polycentric governance and feedback.

Click “continue reading” for a selection of our conversation.
Continue reading PPE Reading Group – September 26th, 2017

PPE Reading Group – September 19th, 2017

The PPE group engages in weekly conversations with diverse points of view in an effort to deepen our understanding of the intersection between politics, philosophy, and economics

This week in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics reading group, we read and discussed The Welfare State as a Fiscal Commons: Problems of Incentives Versus Problems of Cognition by Keith Jakee and Stephen Turner. The article discussed the similarities between the tragedy of the commons and federal entitlement programs. We also read and discussed “Governing the Budgetary Commons” What Can We Learn from Elinor Ostrom? On the discussion board, the conversation center around two main topics: the role of analogy in solving real life problems and the applicability of a commons framework when thinking about the federal budget.

Click “continue reading” for a selection of our conversation. 
Continue reading PPE Reading Group – September 19th, 2017

PPE Reading Group – September 12th, 2017

The PPE group engages in weekly conversations with diverse points of view in an effort to deepen our understanding of the intersection between politics, philosophy, and economics

This week in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics reading group, we read and discussed Elinor Ostrom’s Collective Action and the Evolution of Social Norms. Ostrom reviewed findings on what makes groups cooperate to achieve a better outcome than if each individual worked alone. We also read and discussed Barry R. Weingast’s The Economic Role of Political Institutions: Market-Preserving Federalism and Economic Development. Weingast discussed the role of limited political institutions in developing economic growth, focusing on case studies in the United States, England, Russia, and China. On the discussion board, the conversation centered on the nature of social norms and whether or not the things that make collective action possible are lost as groups scale up. Next week, the group will be reading and discussing The Welfare State as a Fiscal Commons: Problems of Inventive Verses Problems of Cognition by Keith Jakee and Stephan Turner and “Governing the Budgetary Commons” What Can We Learn from Elinor Ostrom? by Ringa Raudla.

Click “continue reading” for a selection of our conversation.
Continue reading PPE Reading Group – September 12th, 2017

IEI Insight: The Effects of Economic Announcements on Equity Markets

This IEI Insight is provided by Ryan Coughlin, a Gail Werner-Robertson Fellow and author of a paper on intraday equity market reactions to macroeconomic announcements.

Markets respond to large macroeconomic announcements. How markets respond and in which direction has been the study of research for decades. When macroeconomic reports on GDP, CPI, and unemployment are released, we expect big movements. While past research has examined macroeconomic announcement effects, my recent work supervised by Dr. Ernie Goss specifically examines intraday announcement effects, especially in light of recent Federal Reserve actions.
Continue reading IEI Insight: The Effects of Economic Announcements on Equity Markets

PPE Reading Group – September 5th, 2017

The PPE group engages in weekly conversations with diverse points of view in an effort to deepen our understanding of the intersection between politics, philosophy, and economics

This week in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics reading group, we read and discussed the first couple chapters of Richard Wagners, Deficits, Debts, and Democracy: Tangling with Tragedy of the Fiscal Commons. Wagner discussed causes as to why the United States has been continually running deficits since the 1960’s. On the discussion board, the conversation center around two main topics: Short term over long-term thinking and the prisoner’s dilemma of budget making. Next week, the group will be reading and discussing “Collective Action and the Evolution of Social Norms” by Elinor Ostrom and “The Economic Role of Political Institutions: Market-Preserving Federalism and Economic Development” by Barry R. Weingast.

Click “continue reading” for a selection of our conversation:
Continue reading PPE Reading Group – September 5th, 2017

Thomson: Fairacres Designation as a Historical Place

The following was written by Kevin Thomson:

The Fairacres neighborhood, located in a wealthy section of Omaha, NE near UNO and Memorial Park, is now on the National Register of Historic Places. The wealthy neighborhood was granted the honor by the National Park Service on July 24, 2017. At first, the designation may seem harmless. The neighborhoods listing on the National Register is a boon for Fairacres homeowners, but the benefits for the average Omaha citizen are less clear. Too many designations can cause problems for the city planners and limit the growth of affordable housing.
Continue reading Thomson: Fairacres Designation as a Historical Place